Landscapes & Geology

Mountains, dunes, dry riverbeds and rivers running wild, Namibia's communal conservancies offer visitors the chance to lose and find themselves in some of the most spectacular landscapes on earth.

Namibia's communal conservancies cover 20% of the land in the country. Within this expanse, there are areas where you can be isolated, alone with your thoughts and hundreds of millions of years of geological history to find perspective.

Namibia's escarpment is a visual expression of the shifting of tectonic plates, when the mass of land that was Gondwana split 180 million years ago. In the geological aftermath, Namibia was forged with flat-topped mountains, deep depressions and jagged rocks that expose hundreds of millions of years of geological activity. For those passionate about geology, Namibia is a fascinating place to explore.

Namibia has 14 vegetation zones, ranging from several variations of desert vegetation to semi-desert, mopane, mountain, thorn bush, highland, dwarf shrub, camel thorn and mixed tree and shrub savannas and the forest savannas and woodlands of the north east. Many spectacular species can only be seen when specific weather conditions persist, and some tree, plant and lichen species remain unidentified or only seen in cycles as long as fifteen years.

Namibia's commitment to conservation crosses borders, providing more space for visitors to explore and maintaining critical ecological integrity of land and wildlife at a regional scale. In the northeastern part of the country, Namibia’s communal conservancies are an important part of the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Park (KAZA), an area larger than Germany and Austria combined, which links spectacular parks and protected areas in Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Explore this space, contemplate the tremendous will it has taken for these governments and people to make a choice to link and protect these lands, and revel in the experience of being part of something bigger than the sum of its parts!

Where to go